Thursday, July 28, 2016

Adria's Lanesville Workshop - A Creative Retreat

Lured by the beauty of the north shore of Boston, I once again brought a group of students to Lanesville, MA for a week of artmaking. Nine lovely people joined me for some serious fun and exploration using mostly acrylics. As I work for Golden Paints, much of my teaching revolves around helping students understand the versatility of the medium and what all those different products actually can do for them.

Our studio, the Lanesville Community Center



It was very exciting to see this student working super big! This is 40" x 30" printmaking paper using the fabulous transparency of Golden High Flow acrylics and hand-cut stencils, below.

Hand cut stencils from a roll of Mylar.

Letting loose with acrylics on paper. Some with lots of water added, some right out of the bottle.

A wonderful wall of experimental painting, layers of thinned out acrylics!




Of course, Gelli plate printing!


Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Fuzzy and Friendly Workshops on Cape Ann this summer!

Last year I spent a week teaching Intuitive Painting on Cape Ann, Massachusetts. We held our classes in the lovely Lanesville Community Center, a perfect studio set up in a perfectly beautiful little New England town on the sea. It was so successful that I am planning to teach again this summer.

My friend and colleague Jodi Colella, fabulous fiber artist and teacher, will also be offering a FiberLAB workshop in Lanesville this August. I want to give her awesome program a shout out.

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Vis a Vis: Adria Arch and Anne Krinsky at Soprafina Gallery



I am very pleased to announce that a selection of my work will be on view at Soprafina Gallery in Boston, MA in April, and delighted that I am showing with my good friend, London-based artist Anne Krinsky, whose work I respect and admire.  

Vis a Vis: Adria Arch and Anne Krinsky, will be on view at Soprafina Gallery in Boston from April 1 to 30, 2016. The show features works informed by the Indian folk traditions the artists encountered during residencies at the Sanskriti Foundation in Delhi in 2014. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Saturday from 11:00 am to 5:30 pm

Please join us for the opening reception on Friday, April 1, from 5:30 to 7:30 pm. 450 Harrison Ave., Boston

We'll  be presenting a gallery talk at 2 pm on Saturday, April 2.

Adria Arch, Stretch, acrylic on canvas, 48" x 48"

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In January 2014, Adria Arch and Anne Krinsky were International Artists-in-Residence at the SanskritiFoundation in Delhi, an educational center dedicated to the preservation and understanding of folk art traditions of India. While in Delhi and during travels in Rajasthan, Arch and Krinsky explored aspects of traditional Indian textiles, papermaking, puppetry and dance. The works to be exhibited at Soprafina grew out of their visual research -- a journey that took both artists to new places in their individual practices.
The ornate and striking leather shadow puppets depicting characters from Hindu mythology provide inspiration for Arch’s work. Beginning with acrylic paint poured onto Mylar, a surface not unlike the translucent parchment used to make the puppets, she cuts around the most evocative shapes and then adheres them to her surfaces. From that point, the paint spills begin to suggest a narrative that Arch enhances with flat shapes of high key color or other design elements drawn from her observations of India.
Adria Arch, Action Verb 12, acrylic on Mylar and panel, 16" x 16"

 






The colors, patterns and techniques of traditional textiles, particularly Phulkari embroideries from the Punjab, are a starting point for Krinsky’s India-inspired works. The diagonal grids, diamond patterns and brilliant marigolds and reds that characterize these textiles animate her paintings on Khadi papers and on panel. Interested both in the geometric regularity of repeated pattern and in its disruption, Krinsky uses acrylic molding pastes, pumice gels and absorbent grounds to create weathered surfaces over which networks of floating lines detour in unanticipated directions.
Anne Krinsky, Lac, acrylic on paper on panel, 24" x 24"




 
Adria Arch, Gulab Jamon 7





Blogposts about my Sanskriti residency experience: 


Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Announcing two painting workshops this summer on Cape Ann


Last summer, I had the good fortune of teaching a week long workshop on Cape Ann with some truly wonderful students. I observed my students growing in confidence and expression by leaps and bounds, and it was extremely gratifying to me. I want to share this experience with more of you this summer and fall with two week long workshops.

Engage in transformative art making during this week-long retreat with me. Our spacious studio, the Lanesville Community Center,  is within walking distance of shady hiking trails and lovely New England beaches. Class sessions will be held in the mornings, with several shorter afternoon programs. Each artist has a full 8 foot table (more if necessary) on which to work. Class size is limited to optimize individualized attention.
The Lanesville Community Center, our lovely studio space for the week.
We use all of the space around the studio.

Gelli plate printing is on the list of the many intuitive techniques we engage in.
 
Spacious tables for each participant

Students share and support each other in growing and trying new ideas.

Group discussions in a supportive and nurturing atmosphere inspire and connect us. 
Participants will make their own arrangements for housing. There are many lovely B and B's as well as weekly rentals available within walking distance of the studio in Lanesville, MAIf you live nearby and want to commute, no problem!

When you are not at the studio, take off to enjoy the beauty of Gloucester, Rocky Neck and the surrounding areas. Come be inspired! 

An intuitive painting exercise in which we begin with exploring brushstrokes and contour line.

Gelli plate monoprints using acrylic paint and some of the foliage around the area.

We take a look at the work together, with the purpose of helping each other grow and try new things. There is no good or bad, only growth and a safe place to try new things in art.

This piece pulls together "shadow paintings" and collage.

A painting inspired by contour lines of leaves.


Session 1: The Infinite Well
(June 26-July 1)
Designed for those who want more time to explore their art making in depth. In a supportive and nurturing atmosphere, you'll find inspiration and instruction. More self-directed, individual mentoring.
 
What is the Infinite Well?
The Infinite Well suggests the inner wellspring of creativity that we access when we go further and explore our art making in depth. This workshop takes off from Adria's intuitive painting classes and gives you the time and support to go deeper.
 
Session 2: Intuitive Painting
(Sept. 11 - 16)
Learn to create your own meaningful expressive adventure, leave the judge behind and follow your intuition. Each class session features a guided exercise that will introduce you to a variety of painting and printing techniques using acrylics.
 
What is intuitive art?
It's all about the  process!  We'll begin the week with a few  guided exercises that encourage you to take risks and stop the inner critic. After that, you'll work independently and benefit from one on one feedback with Adria.

Delve into the expressive use of color, shape and texture while reviewing  ways to jump-start and sustain your  art practice.

All paints and most supplies are provided, thanks to GOLDEN Artist Colors. Students will provide paper, canvas, etc. and other basic equipment.

Tuition: $700, includes 6 mornings (3 hours) of instruction and three 2 hour afternoon programs, plus afternoon and evening access to studio space.


For more info, or to see a syllabus, contact Adria.

To enroll:PayPal link to the right of this entry, or contact Adria to send a check

The Infinite Well - Early bird, $625 if you enroll by Jan. 31.

Intuitive Painting - Early bird, $625 if you enroll by March 31.

Monday, December 14, 2015

Et en fin

The last leg of my French sojourn, I continued to build on esoteric knowledge of this incredibly rich region.

My new friend Jeannette Rogers, another Fellow at Moulin a Nef, is a translator of medieval troubadour poetry from the original language of Occitan into both modern French and English. I never knew of this language, nor of the Cathars, the peace-loving, vegetarian Christian sect that was wiped out during the Inquisition.

The Cathar cross, which you will see everywhere in Toulouse.



After 2 and a half weeks in Auvillar, I spent three days in Toulouse, a city I fell in love with. The rest of the Fellows were all set to go home and I would have been alone at Moulin a Nef. I couldn't face it, so I booked myself a little side trip to this fascinating city. It seemed to me to be about the size of Providence RI, and a river runs through it, too.

Toulouse, France
That is where I was when the Paris attacks of Nov. 13 occurred. In fact, I only knew about it because my friends emailed me to ask if I was ok. I saw the messages upon waking on Saturday morning and my stomach dropped. I quickly reached for the remote control and turned on CNN in my hotel room.

Words are insufficient to describe the horror.

There was a pall cast over the whole country. Elliot, my husband, arrived on Sunday to join me on the last week of my journey and we rented a small car for day trips in the area. We persisted in our plans, the only noticeable difference in security was a group of armed soldiers at the Toulouse airport.

Our first day trip was to visit the prehistoric cave paintings at Fond de Gaume. I would not have known about the caves in southern France had it not been for the fantastic Werner Herzog film, Cave of Forgotten Dreams. With a small group of other tourists, we spent a half an hour viewing 17,000 year old paintings on the walls. The little town of Les Eyzies featured an excellent prehistoric museum that helped to put into context what we had seen.

A bison painting at Fond de Gaume
Photo © N. Aujoulat-CNP-MCC.
As an image maker, I felt very akin to this ancient artist. And clearly, this was someone who practiced painting before hitting the rock walls. You don't just walk in and pop this out without some previous work. Did he or she practice in sand, mud, or on tree bark with chunks of ochre? And why? A human living 30,000 years ago would have been indistinguishable from you or me - humbling and awe-inspiring.

"Isatis tinctoria02". Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Isatis_tinctoria02.JPG#/media/File:Isatis_tinctoria02.JPG
 And finally, I can't leave out our trip to see a woad "factory". Woad (Isatis tinctoria, or pastel, in French) was the plant based pigment of choice to make the color blue before the cheaper, faster manufacture of indigo in India  killed the industry. We visited a little woad artisan shop that demonstrated how the plant was turned into a very light fast and excellent blue dye, which made a lot of people in the south of France very wealthy. I consider myself pretty up on pigments, but I'd never heard of this one.

Plus encore...

Continuing the story of my French adventure... thanks to my wonderful high school French teacher, Jean Price, I was able to both understand and make myself understood. Incroyable!

This was France Profund, or "deep France", as the natives call it because it is so non-touristy. It was especially quiet in November. The thousands of summer pilgrims on the Chemin de St. Jacques had dwindled to just a few, and there were many times when walking around Auvillar that we felt we were the only ones around for miles.

Among the many esoteric things that I learned about this area: pigeonniers, otherwise known as "dovecotes" or places for pigeons to hang out. Seriously, the wealthy landowners of old built these exquisite buildings on their land much to the dislike of their tenants. The smell and noise was probably obnoxious. But look how beautiful!
Square pigeonnier.

Octagonal pigeonnier.

Square pigeonnier.

So what did I find to photograph, what drew my visual interest? In no particular order here are images that I took because I was spontaneously drawn to them, but I do think you can see how the architectural details, some from the middle ages, found their way into the work that I made in my studio at Moulin a Nef, VCCA's French residency program in Auvillar.
Architectural details.

From the church at Moissac, stone carvings from 12 century.

From the church at Moissac, stone carvings from 12 century.
From the church at Moissac, stone carvings from 12 century.

12th Century church in St. Antoine, all details are hand painted.

12th Century church in St. Antoine, all details are hand painted.
12th Century church in St. Antoine, all details are hand painted.

This piece, 12" x 12", was exhibited at Projects Gallery during Art Miami 2015

Installation in my studio, including free hanging elements. Acrylic on Yupo, cardboard. Approx. 40' x 15' x 10'

acrylic on aluminum and Yupo

Installation in my studio, including free hanging elements. Acrylic on Yupo, cardboard. Approx. 40' x 15' x 10'

Detail of installation in my studio, including free hanging elements. Acrylic on Yupo, cardboard. Approx. 40' x 15' x 10'

Detail of installation in my studio, including free hanging elements. Acrylic on Yupo, cardboard. Approx. 40' x 15' x 10'

Auvillar 10, acrylic on Yupo. 36" x 24"