Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Announcing two painting workshops this summer on Cape Ann


Last summer, I had the good fortune of teaching a week long workshop on Cape Ann with some truly wonderful students. I observed my students growing in confidence and expression by leaps and bounds, and it was extremely gratifying to me. I want to share this experience with more of you this summer and fall with two week long workshops.

Engage in transformative art making during this week-long retreat with me. Our spacious studio, the Lanesville Community Center,  is within walking distance of shady hiking trails and lovely New England beaches. Class sessions will be held in the mornings, with several shorter afternoon programs. Each artist has a full 8 foot table (more if necessary) on which to work. Class size is limited to optimize individualized attention.
The Lanesville Community Center, our lovely studio space for the week.
We use all of the space around the studio.

Gelli plate printing is on the list of the many intuitive techniques we engage in.
 
Spacious tables for each participant

Students share and support each other in growing and trying new ideas.

Group discussions in a supportive and nurturing atmosphere inspire and connect us. 
Participants will make their own arrangements for housing. There are many lovely B and B's as well as weekly rentals available within walking distance of the studio in Lanesville, MAIf you live nearby and want to commute, no problem!

When you are not at the studio, take off to enjoy the beauty of Gloucester, Rocky Neck and the surrounding areas. Come be inspired! 

An intuitive painting exercise in which we begin with exploring brushstrokes and contour line.

Gelli plate monoprints using acrylic paint and some of the foliage around the area.

We take a look at the work together, with the purpose of helping each other grow and try new things. There is no good or bad, only growth and a safe place to try new things in art.

This piece pulls together "shadow paintings" and collage.

A painting inspired by contour lines of leaves.


Session 1: The Infinite Well
(June 26-July 1)
Designed for those who want more time to explore their art making in depth. In a supportive and nurturing atmosphere, you'll find inspiration and instruction. More self-directed, individual mentoring.
 
What is the Infinite Well?
The Infinite Well suggests the inner wellspring of creativity that we access when we go further and explore our art making in depth. This workshop takes off from Adria's intuitive painting classes and gives you the time and support to go deeper.
 
Session 2: Intuitive Painting
(Sept. 11 - 16)
Learn to create your own meaningful expressive adventure, leave the judge behind and follow your intuition. Each class session features a guided exercise that will introduce you to a variety of painting and printing techniques using acrylics.
 
What is intuitive art?
It's all about the  process!  We'll begin the week with a few  guided exercises that encourage you to take risks and stop the inner critic. After that, you'll work independently and benefit from one on one feedback with Adria.

Delve into the expressive use of color, shape and texture while reviewing  ways to jump-start and sustain your  art practice.

All paints and most supplies are provided, thanks to GOLDEN Artist Colors. Students will provide paper, canvas, etc. and other basic equipment.

Tuition: $700, includes 6 mornings (3 hours) of instruction and three 2 hour afternoon programs, plus afternoon and evening access to studio space.


For more info, or to see a syllabus, contact Adria.

To enroll:PayPal link to the right of this entry, or contact Adria to send a check

The Infinite Well - Early bird, $625 if you enroll by Jan. 31.

Intuitive Painting - Early bird, $625 if you enroll by March 31.

Monday, December 14, 2015

Et en fin

The last leg of my French sojourn, I continued to build on esoteric knowledge of this incredibly rich region.

My new friend Jeannette Rogers, another Fellow at Moulin a Nef, is a translator of medieval troubadour poetry from the original language of Occitan into both modern French and English. I never knew of this language, nor of the Cathars, the peace-loving, vegetarian Christian sect that was wiped out during the Inquisition.

The Cathar cross, which you will see everywhere in Toulouse.



After 2 and a half weeks in Auvillar, I spent three days in Toulouse, a city I fell in love with. The rest of the Fellows were all set to go home and I would have been alone at Moulin a Nef. I couldn't face it, so I booked myself a little side trip to this fascinating city. It seemed to me to be about the size of Providence RI, and a river runs through it, too.

Toulouse, France
That is where I was when the Paris attacks of Nov. 13 occurred. In fact, I only knew about it because my friends emailed me to ask if I was ok. I saw the messages upon waking on Saturday morning and my stomach dropped. I quickly reached for the remote control and turned on CNN in my hotel room.

Words are insufficient to describe the horror.

There was a pall cast over the whole country. Elliot, my husband, arrived on Sunday to join me on the last week of my journey and we rented a small car for day trips in the area. We persisted in our plans, the only noticeable difference in security was a group of armed soldiers at the Toulouse airport.

Our first day trip was to visit the prehistoric cave paintings at Fond de Gaume. I would not have known about the caves in southern France had it not been for the fantastic Werner Herzog film, Cave of Forgotten Dreams. With a small group of other tourists, we spent a half an hour viewing 17,000 year old paintings on the walls. The little town of Les Eyzies featured an excellent prehistoric museum that helped to put into context what we had seen.

A bison painting at Fond de Gaume
Photo © N. Aujoulat-CNP-MCC.
As an image maker, I felt very akin to this ancient artist. And clearly, this was someone who practiced painting before hitting the rock walls. You don't just walk in and pop this out without some previous work. Did he or she practice in sand, mud, or on tree bark with chunks of ochre? And why? A human living 30,000 years ago would have been indistinguishable from you or me - humbling and awe-inspiring.

"Isatis tinctoria02". Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Isatis_tinctoria02.JPG#/media/File:Isatis_tinctoria02.JPG
 And finally, I can't leave out our trip to see a woad "factory". Woad (Isatis tinctoria, or pastel, in French) was the plant based pigment of choice to make the color blue before the cheaper, faster manufacture of indigo in India  killed the industry. We visited a little woad artisan shop that demonstrated how the plant was turned into a very light fast and excellent blue dye, which made a lot of people in the south of France very wealthy. I consider myself pretty up on pigments, but I'd never heard of this one.

Plus encore...

Continuing the story of my French adventure... thanks to my wonderful high school French teacher, Jean Price, I was able to both understand and make myself understood. Incroyable!

This was France Profund, or "deep France", as the natives call it because it is so non-touristy. It was especially quiet in November. The thousands of summer pilgrims on the Chemin de St. Jacques had dwindled to just a few, and there were many times when walking around Auvillar that we felt we were the only ones around for miles.

Among the many esoteric things that I learned about this area: pigeonniers, otherwise known as "dovecotes" or places for pigeons to hang out. Seriously, the wealthy landowners of old built these exquisite buildings on their land much to the dislike of their tenants. The smell and noise was probably obnoxious. But look how beautiful!
Square pigeonnier.

Octagonal pigeonnier.

Square pigeonnier.

So what did I find to photograph, what drew my visual interest? In no particular order here are images that I took because I was spontaneously drawn to them, but I do think you can see how the architectural details, some from the middle ages, found their way into the work that I made in my studio at Moulin a Nef, VCCA's French residency program in Auvillar.
Architectural details.

From the church at Moissac, stone carvings from 12 century.

From the church at Moissac, stone carvings from 12 century.
From the church at Moissac, stone carvings from 12 century.

12th Century church in St. Antoine, all details are hand painted.

12th Century church in St. Antoine, all details are hand painted.
12th Century church in St. Antoine, all details are hand painted.

This piece, 12" x 12", was exhibited at Projects Gallery during Art Miami 2015

Installation in my studio, including free hanging elements. Acrylic on Yupo, cardboard. Approx. 40' x 15' x 10'

acrylic on aluminum and Yupo

Installation in my studio, including free hanging elements. Acrylic on Yupo, cardboard. Approx. 40' x 15' x 10'

Detail of installation in my studio, including free hanging elements. Acrylic on Yupo, cardboard. Approx. 40' x 15' x 10'

Detail of installation in my studio, including free hanging elements. Acrylic on Yupo, cardboard. Approx. 40' x 15' x 10'

Auvillar 10, acrylic on Yupo. 36" x 24"

La Belle France

This November, I was fortunate to have a residency in Auvillar, France in the south west of the country. Part of the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, this residency is only available to past Fellows of VCCA. It had always been  my dream to do a residency in Europe. Though it is challenging to make art while also trying to absorb a new place that strongly beckons you to engage with the culture and history, I did manage to respond to my surroundings.

Auvillar's famous granary, built in the 1800s and now the site of the Sunday market.
Auvillar itself is a charming, medieval village once famous for painted pottery and goose quill pens. Now it is a sleepy, magical village on the pilgrimage trail, known as the Chemin de St. Jacques de Compostelle. 


The view from the top of Auvillar, overlooking the Garonne River.
Novelist and ceramicist Betty Joyce Nash, left, and Sabine, who lives in Auvillar. Fantastic photographer!
Random beauty: seedpod of Chinese Lantern plant.




So much exotic food at the local markets.
The cheese guy. Le frommagier.
My fellow Fellow, Marilyn Kallet, poet, purchasing her favorite cheeses.

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

WHACK! Pop up weekend

Interior view of WHACK!, photo by Will Howcroft
WHACK!, a pop up exhibit at 49 River St., Beacon Hill, MA, featuring my work as well as my friend Jodi Colella

Myself and Jodi during our artist talks. Jodi's sculpture I/Me is in the foreground. photo by Wendy Seller
Visitors to WHACK on opening night

Jodi explains the influences of her residency in China, earlier this year.

Jodi Colella describing the origins of her sculpture, "Ant"

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

WHACK!

I am pleased to announce that I will be displaying some new work in a pop up exhibit, WHACK!, with my friend and artist colleague Jodi Colella.

Here's our press release. The first fifty visitors get a special, customized WHACK! door prize, (as if  you needed any more encouragement to see the show.)


Adria Arch, Next Nest, acrylic on Dibond, 122 x 122 cm


Jodi Colella, I/Me, fiber, thread, mixed media, 91.5 x 75 x 39 cm
The work will be on view Friday through Sunday, September 25 to 27 at 49 River Street, Beacon Hill, Boston MA, USA. An opening reception will be held on Friday, September 25 from 6 to 9 pm. The artists will discuss their work at 3 pm on Sunday, September 27. Hours are 3 to 9 pm, Friday and Saturday, and Sunday from 2 to 7 pm.

The show’s title refers to the intensity of color and texture on view and the immediacy and urgency of a three day show.

Adria Arch’s new paintings start with a splash. Working in an intuitive, gestural tradition, she brings in the element of chance at the beginning. The liquid spill, a pooling pour of paint, is the first mark that determines a causative sequence of subsequent marks. For works that are concerned with feeling and surprise and bursts of energy, Arch lets the abstract contour, and the initial color, of that first exuberant gesture determine the spaces she builds across her large-scale surfaces.

Jodi Colella transforms stuffed animals already imbued with meaning into dimensional, imaginary beings that are rich in pattern, color and texture. Obsessed with process, she uses needle and thread to reconstruct found objects into figures laced with whimsy and threat. As embodiments of human nature these beasts resonate with the cultural and psychological plights of the modern world.


Saturday, August 22, 2015

New video about my painting process

Thanks to the fabulous Jonathan Barbato at Arlington Cable Media and videographer Samantha Williams-Radecic, I now have an excellent video to show you my working process.

Sunday, August 16, 2015

August 1 - 7 I spent with 15 brave souls who took my workshop, Intuitive Painting on Cape Ann. I made this video to demonstrate how this approach to teaching art can change profoundly how you see and make art.

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

New work on canvas

I've been hard at work in the studio expanding my horizons, pushing myself to the next new exploration which is working at a larger scale and working on canvas and other more permanent surfaces. This has been the most fun I've had in the studio in a long time. I am super excited about what I've been doing.

Stretch, acrylic on canvas, 48" x 48"

Plunge, acrylic on canvas, 48" x 48"
Debut, acrylic on aluminum panel, 48" x 48"
Plunk, acrylic on canvas, 72" x 60"
Rose Garden, acrylic on canvas, 72" x 60"

Swim, acrylic on canvas, 72" x 60"